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GREG GIRARD: TOKYO–YOKOSUKA 1976–1983

Opening Reception and Book Launch: May 4th 6-9pm
Exhibition Dates: May 4-31 2019
Location: 1151 Queen St E

Patel Gallery is pleased to present as part of the CONTACT Photography festival Greg Girard's solo exhibition and Toronto Book Launch of, Tokyo–Yokosuka 1976–1983 with the Magenta Foundation.

Greg Girard’s photographs from Tokyo -Yokosuka 1976–-1983 are artifacts of a pre-bubble Tokyo, before it acquired imaginative shape as the late 20th century’s default for a 21st century city. Girard’s Tokyo mixes post-war scruffiness with a transitional modernity, capturing moments before the city (and Japan) exploded slow-motion into our late 20th century consciousness. While living in Tokyo, Girard started photographing in Yokosuka, just southwest of Tokyo, home to a sprawling US Navy base, and the many bars and clubs clustered nearby. As Japan, and Tokyo in particular, was about to launch itself into Tomorrowland, the base and its host community (and others like it in the region), a vestige of Japan’s defeat in WW II, were about to tip into Yesterday.

This body of work provides a glimpse of the moment when two historical streams passed each other headed in opposite directions: one, the decline of US pre-eminence in the post-war world, particularly in Asia; the other, the emergence of an Asian city, the non-West, as the default for what the future might look like.

Greg Girard is a Canadian photographer whose work has examined the social and physical transformation in Asia’s largest cities for more than three decades. Girard's work is in the collection of the National Gallery of Canada, The Art Gallery of Canada and the Vancouver Art Gallery. His photographs have appeared in Time Magazine, Newsweek, Forbes, Elle and The New York Times and he has exhibited in galleries across Asia and North America.

For inquiries please email devan@patel.gallery

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VIVEK SHRAYA: TRAUMA CLOWN

Opening Reception: Saturday May 4th 6-9pm
Exhibition Dates: May 4-June
Location: Patel Projects 184 Munro St E

Patel Projects is pleased to announce as part of the CONTACT Photography Festival an exhibition by Vivek Shraya entitled Trauma Clown.

Trauma Clown is a new photographic series by Vivek Shraya that traces the correlation between the amount of suffering a marginalized artist shares in their work and the increase in their commodification. Using herself as the subject, Shraya depicts the expectation that artists who experience oppression must repeatedly revisit traumatic experiences for marketable entertainment—and the material and psychic effects that being a “trauma clown” has on the artist, the art, and audiences.

Shraya is a multidisciplinary artist based in Calgary, Alberta. She is the author of the best- selling book, I’m Afraid of Men, and was nominated for the Polaris Music Prize for her album with Queer Songbook Orchestra “Part-Time Woman." Her previous photo series, Trisha, received international media coverage, including in Vanity Fair, and has been exhibited across North America.

Patel Projects is a project space and incubator that presents accessible, cutting-edge work by emerging artists and curators. The alternative arts space provides a platform for experimental practices, innovative exhibition formats and new experiences of art. With an emphasis on artistic integrity and ethical practice, Patel Projects also works on public art, programming, licensing, publishing, sponsorship, activations, and more.

Patel Projects is located at 184 Munro Street (rear entrance off of Mt. Stephens). Open by appointment only. For inquiries please contact info@patel.gallery.

Creative direction: Vivek Shraya

Photography: Zachary Ayotte

Makeup & Hair: Alanna Chelmick

Costume: Mic. Carter for L'Uomo Strano

Set assistants: Adam Holman & Natasha Jensen

Special thank you to Natasha Jensen and Art Commons team for granting us permission to shoot in the Arts Learning Centre, the Engineered Air Theatre, and the Jack Singer Concert Hall of Arts Commons.